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Standards and Colors of the American Revolution

When I started putting SYW units together I just picked out a picture from a uniform plate that I figured was a standard Prussian infantryman (I was wrong) and slapped on a flag from a sheet that I purchased from Baccus (the 15th Regiments, cause it looked cool/different). It was only after a few weeks of research that I discovered that these things really were of any significance.

So when I started with the AWI, I wanted to get it right from the beginning.  I asked a lot of questions on TMP and the main answer that I got was, “No information is available, do what you like.”  I wasn’t satisfied with that and finally got a recommendation for a book to help out.  This is my opinion of that book.

Cover
Cover

Standards and Colors of the American Revolution by Edward W. Richardson. This book starts around $50 (US) and goes up from there.

I began to look through it and found a lot of the information very useful.  It is primarily black and while with a large color section in the middle.  It covers the Patriot side in the most detail, with some info on British Flags, not to much past the basics.  French and German flags are given rudimentary treatment, almost in passing.  The vast majority of the descriptions are textual rather than pictorial.

While it doesn’t even come close to comprehensive coverage on the forces involved, it does talk about trends and give some ideas to the types of flags that “could” have been carried.  I found this helpful, but not to the point where I would suggest anyone but the most hardend grognard would need this book in their collection.  Most of the flags covered in detail can be found online.  I always thought there had to be more info out there than what I could find online, but I was wrong.

So, at $50 minimum, I think I would pass on this book.  There is some good info in the book, but not quite enough to justify the expense.  I think the greatest thing I gained from this book was the confidence to make my own flags for units without known flags.  Something not easy to do when you are used to the Seven Years War plethora of information.

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11th Massachusetts Regiment

This is the last regular unit left that saw action at Hubbardton.  I couldn’t find any specific information on this unit so I painted it up as a generic Mass regiment.  One nice thing about the uniforms from this war is that there is a set of generic combinations you can use for each state involving some combination of blue or brown coats with some combination of red or white turnbacks.  There was a regulation (not highly followed) made at some point determining the colors for each state.  Like I say it wasn’t strictly adhered to, but gives us a fall back for those units with no info.

Massachusetts was deemed to be blue coats with white turnbacks.  This unit will also serve a different Massachusetts regiment for the battles of Freeman’s Farm and Bemis Heights.

11 Mass Home-Made Flag
11 Mass Home-Made Flag

I was able to have some fun with the flag for this unit as well.  There is no info on uniforms, and flag info is even harder to come by.  So many times you end up having/getting to make up the flag.  Now some states have symbols that occur more often or are associated with their colony/state.  In New England, and more specifically Massachusetts, it’s the pine tree.  So I took just a generic pine tree icon and put it on a white field.  I like the look of it.

I have tended to get much more adventurous with my flags after getting frustrated trying to get them accurate.  You will see many more creative flags in the coming months.

11th Massachusetts Regiment

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Gaining Even More Mass

After my last post, I wanted to show an even larger grouping of figures.  This is now 4 of my units at 72 men apiece, roughly 300.  This is a fairly average size for a unit in the field during the Saratoga Campaign.

Click on them for a much larger image!

300 Man Unit
300 Man Unit (1)

…and from another angle…

300 Man Unit (2)
300 Man Unit (2)

Quite nice to look at in my opinion.  I have twice this amount painted up in my Patriot forces alone, and could field around 600 Patriots and 600 British/German troops.  I like to think that if I had someone painting an opposing force I could play Hubbardton, Cowpens, or Eutaw Springs at 1:1 very easily.  I would like to go for something like this eventually.  But for now, I’m on my own and I’d just like to get a decent size battle on the field.

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Gaining Mass

With my choice to double my previous SYW unit size and go with 72 figures in a unit, I think I am getting the effect I started out to achieve.  With a nuber of units on the board, it is starting to look more like a battle as opposed to some unit markers.

I have 7 units of patriots painted, that’s 525 figures.  Even if these are 6mm, they still look great ranked up in a group. Here’s two of them together.

Two Units - 150 Figures
Two Units - 150 Figures

You can see here that they are really starting to look like a mass of men on the field.  Perhaps a shot from the side allows you to see them better, they are 6mm after all!

Two Units - 150 Figures (2)
Two Units - 150 Figures (2)

I’m pretty happy with the results.  I will try to post another unit in the group every now and then.  I’m not sure my camera abilities will allow me to get an effective picture of these guys in a line.  That would be the best way to show them.  Pete from Baccus Miniatures had a picture of a napoleonic regiment in 1:1 on his site in the new section.  Quite worth a look.

I hope to be getting some scenery to make my pictures look a little more “realistic”.  I would like some trees in the background and some grass underneath them once in a while.

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Warner’s Additional Continental Regiment

This is a unit that is near and dear to me as a Vermonter, even if it is my adoptive home state.  I wanted to do this unit early on, but not as my first unit because I wanted to work the bugs out of my painting first.  I really like the way they came out.

Due to the nature of the disputed land between New York and New Hampshire, the Continental Congress couldn’t authorize a “state” unit from the area called Vermont without choosing sides in the dispute.  So an “additional” regiment was created under Seth Warner, as voted by the Vermonters who made up the unit.  Warner beat out Ethan Allen to head this group, that was previously known as the Green Mountain Boys.  Most historians say this unit would not be known as the GMB’s, but anyone from Vermont knows they were the Green Mountain Boys.

The took part in a fair bit of the Saratoga campaign and no campaign army would be complete without them.

So, here are the Green Mountain Boys.

Warner’s Additional Continental Regiment

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Wow! Long Time, No Post

I just checked in after quite some absence.  I see it has been since the end of September for the last post.  Holy Shit!  I need to get going.  To be honest, I became a little disappointed in the project as there were only two comments on the blog and there were very few views.  After checking the views today I see that people are still visiting with two months of inactivity.

So I will try to get some more pictures up presently.  I have completed the entire OOB for Hubbardton for both sides and have begun to work on the OOB for Freeman’s farm.

In the meantime I have also begun to fool around with another period, though still in 6mm.  I will get some pictures up for that soon as well.