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3 Squadrons of SYW Cavalry

About three years ago I started a SYW project to go with the Might & Reason rules.  I didn’t know a thing about the war or the combatants and used it as a springboard into serious historical war gaming and actual research on a period.  I have taken a few detours (like painting 2600 AWI troops) along the way, but it’s been fun.  Along the way I set Lobositz and Kolin as the two battles I wanted to be able to game as a goal.

I am now ONE UNIT away from completing my goal of having the forces ready.   I thought it was time to show the troops off a little.   The following gallery shows 30 units of Cavalry ready to go.  When I looked at them, I found I had very round numbers of these units, twenty units of dragoons/curassiers and ten units of Hussars.  I use 14 troopers to a unit and 10 units is 140 men, almost a full squadron on paper, and certainly as much as anyone had in the saddle in an engagement.  So I lined them up in three rows and took some pictures.  The third row consists of my Hussars and I only use 10 troops to a unit for the lights, so they would be a little light, but let’s not split hairs.

I think seeing large numbers of models in units like this really helps you to imagine the spectacle that would have been warfare in the mid 18th century.  This is a single 400 man unit, there would have been many battles with 12,000+ cavalry men per side.

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British Forces for Freeman’s Farm

Finally some new pictures.  While I havn’t been posting as I needed some time to assess the amount of time I was spending taking pictures and blogging versus the feedback, I have been painting like a madman.  Well, like a madman for me, I’m a very slow painter.

I finished all of the forces that will be on the table for the British side in my Freeman’s Farm scenario.  This is 932 infantry, four command stands, and seven gun stands.  Quite a tidy little group if I don’t say so myself.

These are not my best photos as I’m still trying to work out the best way to take effective pictures of large groups of miniatures.  I have it down pat for small groups, but still a lot to learn.

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Updated Project Size

I have not been on top of my project size page as I should lately.  I just updated it as I have recently passed the 2100th figure mark.  It seems very rewarding to get this far.  I am a completionist and would like to be able to run any scenario I would like without having to worry about if I have enough units or having to make unreasonable proxies.  I don’t mind exchanging one unit of continentals for another, but would like to stick with militia representing militia and hat companies representing hat companies.

I just started my first unit of dragoons and they are going fine.  I really don’t like painting horses, that’s one of the reasons that I like the AWI so much.  I should have some more pics up soon.

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Gaining Mass, 600 Troops

Another installment of my continuing effort to show how great large amounts of small figures look compared to small amounts of large figures.  I have been adding approx 150 troops to every picture.  When I placed the troops for my British Hubbardton photo, I thought it would be a great opportunity to show the 600 troops.

mass-600-1

These troops would be a representation of two British regiments for the Saratoga Campaign at a 1:1 ratio .

600 Models

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Big Units

In my continuing efforts to show what 6mm has to offer in quality of quantity, I have taken some pictures of the next step in the “Gaining Mass” series which I will now call the “6mm Effect”.

This is a group of 6 units, approximately 450 troops.  This is larger than most regular regiments that fought in the Saratoga Campaign.  Though some of the militia regiments got pretty stupid big, over 1000.

450 Troops in One Block

Showing Mass 450 Troops
Showing Mass 450 Troops
Showing Mass 450 Troops, part 2
Showing Mass 450 Troops, part 2

This represents about 1/3 of the total troops that I have painted so far.  I need to start taking more pictures.

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Gaining Even More Mass

After my last post, I wanted to show an even larger grouping of figures.  This is now 4 of my units at 72 men apiece, roughly 300.  This is a fairly average size for a unit in the field during the Saratoga Campaign.

Click on them for a much larger image!

300 Man Unit
300 Man Unit (1)

…and from another angle…

300 Man Unit (2)
300 Man Unit (2)

Quite nice to look at in my opinion.  I have twice this amount painted up in my Patriot forces alone, and could field around 600 Patriots and 600 British/German troops.  I like to think that if I had someone painting an opposing force I could play Hubbardton, Cowpens, or Eutaw Springs at 1:1 very easily.  I would like to go for something like this eventually.  But for now, I’m on my own and I’d just like to get a decent size battle on the field.

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Gaining Mass

With my choice to double my previous SYW unit size and go with 72 figures in a unit, I think I am getting the effect I started out to achieve.  With a nuber of units on the board, it is starting to look more like a battle as opposed to some unit markers.

I have 7 units of patriots painted, that’s 525 figures.  Even if these are 6mm, they still look great ranked up in a group. Here’s two of them together.

Two Units - 150 Figures
Two Units - 150 Figures

You can see here that they are really starting to look like a mass of men on the field.  Perhaps a shot from the side allows you to see them better, they are 6mm after all!

Two Units - 150 Figures (2)
Two Units - 150 Figures (2)

I’m pretty happy with the results.  I will try to post another unit in the group every now and then.  I’m not sure my camera abilities will allow me to get an effective picture of these guys in a line.  That would be the best way to show them.  Pete from Baccus Miniatures had a picture of a napoleonic regiment in 1:1 on his site in the new section.  Quite worth a look.

I hope to be getting some scenery to make my pictures look a little more “realistic”.  I would like some trees in the background and some grass underneath them once in a while.