Posted on

Rangers (4)

I have finally finished the last of my current Galloping Major figures.  These last few were a lot of fun.  I really like painting the tricorns and lace on the uniforms.  There’s not a lot to say about them that hasn’t been said before as this is the fourth lot of Rangers that I have painted.

I engaged in a sort of race (known only to me) with The Major as I wanted to get to a point where I had painted the entire range, this meant that I had to paint faster than he could sculpt and get through the production process.  Not really a fair competition, but hey, there you go.

Without further ado.

Posted on

Rangers (3) – Rogers and Co.

I have been anticipating these guys for a long time.  This is the first new release from The Galloping Major since I started painting his figures, so they set back my complete figures percetages creating a desire to get some paint on them quickly.  It still took me a little while as I was waiting to see what others have done with them.  So far, the only painted example is by the Major himself on his site.  With that inspiration and the photo on the back of the The Annotated and Illustrated Journals of Major Robert Rogers as my guide, I went for it.

The following are the results, I hope I have done the figure justice as it’s fantastic.  It’s my first attempt at 28mm 18th Century lace really.  It’s a time consuming, but not un-enjoyable process.  I had an amazing amount of fun painting the tri-corn on the other Ranger officer, and it makes me look even more forward to the eminent releases from the galloping major.  We’ve already seen the Provincial officer, I’m hoping for other regular types in the very near future.

Posted on

5 Figures in Twenty-four Hours

I’ve been at a conference away from home for a few days now. One of the advantages of this is that I have had more painting time than I usually do in a house with three small children. I typically paint twelve figures in a month as I usually paint about two and a half hours a week.

I brought twelve figures with me on the trip with high hopes. You see I am in a race with The Galloping Major, I want to finish one of each of his figures before he releases more of them. I’m in the home stretch and this trip is gonna help. In addition to the FIW troops, i brought along some Copplestone Neo-sovs to paint for my new Dead of Winter project, so I brought some Mantic plastic zombies along as well. (though one was popped off my painting base by the TSA guys when they searched my bag due to having all sorts of funny tools and paint bottles in it). I watched for ten minutes as the airport security swiped every paint bottle and tested it for bomb traces.

Inside of twenty-four hours of arriving in the hotel room, I managed to paint five rangers from start to finish. Here’s a rough shot taken with my iPad, sorry for the poor quality, better pics are on the way.

20110627-043458.jpg

Posted on

Wash Experiments – Part 1

In my continuing persuit of better quality for my 28mm models, I’ve taken some advice from a thread I started on TMP.  I’m going to try washing the white basecoat and then drybrushing over that.  I’ve created a grey wash with some paint and Future floor polish that I have from some previous experiments years ago.

Here is the original model, turn down your monitor brightness or the white may cause some temporary blindness.

Here is the same model with a grey wash on it.  I don’t think the photo shows just how dark the actual wash is, but I’m not very happy with just washing the white.

Here is the same model with a white drybrush over the the wash.  I’m a big fan of this actually.  I will most likely use this method, it’s all down to fine tuning it now.

More experiments to follow, I have some figures primed white and grey that I will be experimenting on with more washes.

Posted on

First 28mm Historical Figures

I’ve painted a lot of 6mm guys in the same pose, I mean A LOT of 6mm guys in the same pose. It’s time for a bit of a change. I first started painting 28mm “Heroic” sci-fi stuff for a short while before I become interested in historical gaming. I didn’t really do it well though. I suppose it’s time to try a little harder.

I ordered some Front Rank AWI figures to get started with. I have painted more AWI figures than anywhere else and I already have Sharp Practice as a rule set. I just ordered some test models. “Test Models,” doesn’t sound that evil does it? I have avoided them for years, as it always translated to “wasted time” to me. But now I’m a firm believer in trying things out and trying them a few different ways.

Working in 6mm, I’ve been able to block paint EVERYTHING and get away with it. In 6mm, you are working to make the unit look good, not the individual. Here is my first block painted British regular or hatman. Everything is in the right place and the right color, it’s just that it lacks…character.

I need to add something to make the model look more three dimensional. I only have experience with dry brushing and some with black lining. So I thought I would try black lining my other test model.

Here is my second test model. I block painted it as well, but black lined his straps with a technical pen ( Pigma Micron 0.25mm) to get the definition on the straps. I think the picture looks better than the model.

Still not happy with the results, I decided I had to try something else.

This figure has been dry brushed and black-lined. But this time, I painted the thin straps black and the edges of the thick straps black, then painted white on the tops of them. I also primed it gray, drybrushed the small clothes with white, then painted them with ivory. I was hoping this would break up the white areas. His red coat also has a lighter color drybrushed on top for depth.

I have another in the works at the moment, but I’m not really sure what combination to try on him. I’m hoping to get this figured out soon as I have my first Mohawks arriving from The Galloping Major Wargames soon!

Anyway, here is a gallery of my first efforts, with a few comparison pics thrown in. All models are Front Rank.

Posted on

Flag Bearer Conversion

The British troops last carried a standard into battle at Laing’s Nek, and therefore the Baccus range doesn’t have any colonial Brits with flags. I like flags with my troops dammit, and my Brits will be carrying one on Mars.

So, I took a marching pose trooper and cut off the rifle, drilled out (with a dremmel) what I couldn’t cut and placed a straightened paper clip in it’s place. I was also careful to drill a spot in the base to stick the paper clip for added stability.

Then I created my own little standard for a unit on the Martian Establishment, by replacing the ring of thistles with Mars in the center. I also used the regimental colors for a unit with red, white or black facings and put the large St. George’s Cross on it, but with a green field.

As the stand will really serve as a musician in Toofatlardies rules, I also added a bugler to the stand.

Posted on

Hubbartdon’s British Troops

I have already posted the Patriot troops, so it’s about time the bad guys got their due.  The following units represent the British OOB for the Hubbarton conflict. I’ll describe the units in the first picture below.

Out front is the commander Brigadier Frasier.  Next is the 24th Regiment, behind them the grenadiers, light infantry, and Natives/Canadiens.

Bringing up the rear is von Riedesel followed by his Brunswick troops.  First the grenadiers and then the light infantry.

Hubbardton’s Brits

Posted on

Indians Sir, Thousands of Them!

Well, 110 of them anyway.  I have been working on these troops for quite a while now and continually meant to take some pictures of them to post, but never really got around to it.  These are the first “skirmish” troops that I have posted.  I use 12 figures to a base rather than my usual 24, giving a unit of 36 troops to my skirmish bases.  There are no guidlines to basing in Two For Tea, but I Will base troops types that can only use skirmish formations this way.

Indians took very little part in any set-piece battles of the AWI, the mostly served as scouts and raiders for the British.  I intend to write some “What if…?” scenarios featuring more native troops in them.  It’s hard to let such colorful troops sit on the sidelines.

I used various Ospreys for inspiration, as well as Troiani.   One of the things that strikes a newby about Native Americans at the time is that they wore a great deal of red and blue.   Evidently this is the color of cloth that was most commonly traded to them.  I never imagined them tramping through the forest in bright red leggings, but hey, you learn something new all the time.  I couldn’t bring myself to paint them this way for a long time, hence the first two units have  only buckskin and white shirts for color.

The last unit is a mix of Indian troops and white troops.  I was reading The Burning of the Valleys and it talks quite a bit about Brandt’s Volunteers, a mixed unit of Indian and white troops.  Many other OOB’s list things like “Canadiens and Indians” in the lists.  So here I have a double duty unit that can represent the various mish mash irregular units used by the British in the North.

I created one Indian command stand to represent Brandt in a scenario that I will publish soon.  I also hope write something about the Newtown battle, where the Indians decided to stay and fight it out.

The following are 3 units of Indians and one command stand.

Iroquois and Other Native Americans

Posted on

British Light Infantry

As part of Fasier’s Advanced Corp, the Light Battalion saw action at Hubbardton and both Battles of Freeman’s Farm.  These guys were great fun to paint.  I love the units that mix up uniforms.  The tough part is to pick a reasonable mix and ratio that is accurate enough to keep you happy and still looks good.

My main reference for this was the EXCELLENT resource made available by the Perry’s on their site.  It is called BRITISH TROOPS IN THE SARATOGA CAMPAIGN, by Brendan Morrissey.   Due to poor design, you have to select AWI articles from the drop down and then choos the British option.  I can’t say how fantastic this article is for anyone interested in this campaign.  It’s everything the painted needs to know, served up on a silver platter.

The interesting thing about AWI Brit LI is that they have these horse hair crests on their hats and they can be many different colors.  Good luck figuring it out, the article from the Perrys is the only place I’ve ever seen someone try to even hazard a guess.

I had a lot of fun with this unit, I just wish they had carried a flag.

British Light Infantry

Posted on

Stick with the Red Coats

As I near completion of my Saratoga Campaign project, I have been getting itchy feet for a new period.  I will not abandon AWI, but would like to expand my painting to cover two periods at once.  I don’t really fancy going back to 7YW yet as it still fills the same niche for me that AWI does, but I like AWI more.

My first choice was Colonial British wars in South Africa.  I love the uniforms and the period is dripping with atmosphere and great movies to watch for inspiration.  A quick trip to Amazon for Zulu and Zulu Dawn and some Ospreys later, I was definantaly ready.  Even better was the fact that Baccus was expanding it’s colonial british range at a fantastic pace, the stage could not be more set.

First roadblock: No interesting battles.  The more I read the more I realized British colonial battles are pretty much one sided affairs with the Brits decimating the natives.  So the redcoats stand there and volley at the charging savages until one side breaks.  With the occasional decimation of the Brits to almost break the monotony.   I like a bit of maneuver in my games.

Second roadblock: No rules that I like.  The more I looked at different rules, the more I decided there were no interesting battles.  The rules I did find were simple enough though.  I think this period is more suited to skirmish gaming, but that is a purely personal opinion.

So as I drifted from the Zulu wars, glazed over the Sudan campaign, I read more about the Boer Wars.  This was a fascinating conflict.  Two huge forces duking it out in the wilderness.  Problem is, how do you game Boers?  They were rarely seen by the brits (sometimes for entire battles) and there were a number of night actions and ambushes.  This war seemed to hard to game with any level of real flavor for the period and still be fun.  Worst of all, the British uniform switched from the brilliant red to boring old khacki for almost every unit.  Not much fun to paint.

Well, I realized this sometime between ordering the Baccus figs and their arrival from Blighty.  When they came, I had to paint a few, right, just to see how they looked.  When units arrived in SA, they had nice shiney white helmets that they quickly stained with tea so as not to stand out very much.  I didnt’ really like this look, so I did some test models both ways, white helmets and tea stained helmets.

I also painted my very first 6mm beard and mustache with this group.  I couldn’t pass up the opportunity and the figures are that good that you can see them.

I was quite impressed with them, too bad I won’t be painting more.  Here are the test models in all their glory.

I had my first mishap with an order from Baccus with these troops.  It seems about half of the bayonets were broken off during shipping.  I emailed Pete and he resonded with his usually high standard of customer service.

There was a game called Martian Emprires that I would consider with these troops, but I couldn’t find a suitable martian race in 6mm to even give it a try.  I’m not sure that I’m ready for VSF but if anything would get me into it these figures would.