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Anglo-American Provincials

Ahhh, a chance to paint The Galloping Major’s miniatures again.  These are the guys that I’ve missed the most on my break from historical minis.  I’ve been watching people paint them and biding my time, well, I finally ordered them.  First impression of the figures is that they are cracking!  Great character and lots of great details, but nicely raised so they are a joy to paint.

I struggled with the uniform to paint for a while.  I’m a die hard New Englander these days, so I wanted to paint them as Massachusetts men, but the uniforms were more drab.  So in the end I went with the New Jersey Provincials, they are very similar to the Mass troops, but they have white gaiters and a yellow hat band.  Very minor differences I know, but there you go, a little splash of color to liven up the table.

Painting these guys was like talking to a college friend that you haven’t talked to for years, you can easily slip into a comfortable and fun activity after being away for a long time.  After a few brush strokes, it was like I was still in my 7 month spree of painting the other GM figures.

Here’s a few more shots.  I still have 9 more to go and they are all primed and sitting on the painting table.

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Mohawks (5) – Warpaint Time

So, I’ve had these lads sitting around for some time.  I currently have 120ish models from the Galloping Major and that includes NO doubles of the same figure.  Pretty impressive.  When I began to order from the Major, I made a small purchase and decided I love them then made a larger purchase, which happened to be one of everything at the time.  So I had an extra pack of Mohawks around and I could never bring myself to paint them, and this has bothered me for a long time.

Many painters and gamers buy impulsively and have LARGE amounts of lead laying around ready to be painted.  I am not one of those guys, due to a young family I have a very SMALL stipend available for purchases each month, so small that I can easily keep up with painting them and have no left over pile that I won’t ever get to.  That being said I never found the time to paint my “doubles”.  I made a deal with myself, I would paint them but I would do it quickly and dirty, something I can’t normally bring myself to do!   Many period painting show large amounts of the natives in black warpaint covering their entire bodies.  I have two such painted guys in my collection already, since the Native flesh takes me the longest to accomplish, I thought this is where I could shave the most time off.

I think they look a little odd taken as a group by themselves, but once I mix them with the 30 others that I own, they should fit in nicely.

I also painted this guy a while back and I’ve been waiting to have some other FIW stuff painted so I could add him to a post.  This is the last of the Soldiers Fee from the Galloping Major.  You can never have enough club wielding Indians in the forest.

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Settlers Defending (2)

 

This is my second group of Settlers Defending from the Galloping Major.  His figures continue to get better and better.  I enjoyed painting these guys even more than I enjoyed painting the last lot.  The addition of the vests added a lot of detail and interest into the figures.  I really like the way they look as a group.

Along with this lot I have painted one of the “Soldiers Free” miniatures. This lad is supposed to be suitable ambiguous so you can use him for many different roles.  I’ve got him painted as an older civic leader who’s dusted off his old uniform to lead the settlers on a mission to rescue their women, or something like that.    I really like the figure and the look of determination on is tiny little 28mm face.

Just another great group of figures to paint an look at.  Here they are in close ups.

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Settlers Defending (1)

These guys are the first of my Anglo American Settlers from Galloping Major Wargames.  There is another pack on my painting table as I write this.  This group is all in shirt sleeves with a mottly looking assortment of equipment.

The vast majority of the encounters in the FIW were border skirmishes between Indians and settlers.  The natives tended to head south, get close to a settlement and lay in wait.  Before the sun came up, they pounced on the isolated cabins, stole who and what they could, fired the rest and headed for home.

I live about 30 miles from the dreaded Missisquoi Abenaki settlement that was a major staging point for Indian raids.  So these lads might have been my neighbors in a different life.

I think these figures fill a great place in games scenarios.  There’s another pack available that I’ve already mentioned and some concept sketches for a third pack on the Galloping Major’s Blog.  I look forward to seeing all of them on the table lending support to the Rangers and Regulars or defending some log cabins.

Here are the close-ups.

 

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Review of Bloody Mohawk

Bloody Mohawk  by Robert Berleth

This is simply a fantastic book, both in terms of writing and content.  I thoroughly enjoyed it from the moment I started reading until the moment I put it down.  It takes you through the Mohawk Valley from 1713-1794 and details the major ethinic groups and individuals that lived and competed in the area.

I was primarily interested in the French and Indian War for this area, but I was riveted with the American War of Independence sections as well.  The area was involved with the Saratoga Campaign which is one of the events that I have previously researched.

I had always wondered what “Palatine Germans” were when reading about events here and now I know.  The interplay between the different ethnic groups is clearly defined and explained in the book against the back drop of two wars and many events.   You leave the  book knowing why events happened here and with a detailed account of the major battles as well.  The writing is very well done and captures your interest from the outset.

By 1713 the Mohawk Valley was home to Palatine Germans, Dutch, English, Scots, Irish, New Englanders, Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, Seneca, and Tuscarora.  Each of these groups intermarried and related to the others through trade and travel.  It’s during this time that the Iroquois League denigrates and New York becomes more than a backwater.
Can’t recommend it enough, get this book if you are interested in the FIW!

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Rangers (4)

I have finally finished the last of my current Galloping Major figures.  These last few were a lot of fun.  I really like painting the tricorns and lace on the uniforms.  There’s not a lot to say about them that hasn’t been said before as this is the fourth lot of Rangers that I have painted.

I engaged in a sort of race (known only to me) with The Major as I wanted to get to a point where I had painted the entire range, this meant that I had to paint faster than he could sculpt and get through the production process.  Not really a fair competition, but hey, there you go.

Without further ado.

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Mohawks (4) – Last of the Mohawk…ins

It’s with great pleasure that put the final bits of paint on these fine warriors.  I really enjoyed painting the Mohawks as they were the first FIW figs that I painted and are really a lot of fun.  I used a lot of blue and read and warpaint on this last batch.  Not much to say that hasn’t already been said about painting them here.  I can’t wait to get my hands on some rumored Indians with hand weapons coming from the Galloping Major in the distant future.

Anyway, here they are.

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Summer Time and Hubbardton Reenactment

I have been quite quite on the blog for a bit, but that’s because I’ve been doing quite a bit of traveling lately.  I started in late June with a  trip to Philidelphia for work, so no time for taking in to many sites.  Then it was off to Quebec City for a fun trip with the family.  I’ve done the military sites before so more of a culinary and shopping trip this time, we try to go as often as possible.  Then back home for one day before it was off to Southern Vermont for camping and a reenactment of the Battle of  Hubbardton.   All in a two week period, so no time for painting or posting.

I got some great pictures of the reenactment and a few of Quebec City.  It’s really had to get good pictures of the city with my crappy camera, but here a few.  Hubbardton was much easier as the reenactors came within 5 feet of us for the retreat portion and discharged a volley or three right there.  The kids loved it and the cannons were a big hit with my three year olds.

I made some comments on the a few pictures so do look for them.  The last 10 or so are just pics of the reenactors as they filed past, just trying to capture as many guys in closeups as time would allow.

Here they are.

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Huron (3)

I have finished my last batch of Huron warriors.  These guys were a lot of fun to paint and I even made a few alterations to them.  I’m not a big fan of headbands and in this last group I had a few guys with headbands, the one in the blanket and the guy standing and pointing, so I went to work on them.  I started with a dremel to grind them down and do the bulk of the work, then I hit them with a small round file to get a good shape back.  I think it came out alright and if you didn’t know it was done, you might not even notice.

I never really became comfortable with the green and purple warpaint so it was used sparingly throughout.  I really wish I was more creative with it in general, but it’s one of those things that I need to work on I guess.

Here they are as individuals.

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Rangers (3) – Rogers and Co.

I have been anticipating these guys for a long time.  This is the first new release from The Galloping Major since I started painting his figures, so they set back my complete figures percetages creating a desire to get some paint on them quickly.  It still took me a little while as I was waiting to see what others have done with them.  So far, the only painted example is by the Major himself on his site.  With that inspiration and the photo on the back of the The Annotated and Illustrated Journals of Major Robert Rogers as my guide, I went for it.

The following are the results, I hope I have done the figure justice as it’s fantastic.  It’s my first attempt at 28mm 18th Century lace really.  It’s a time consuming, but not un-enjoyable process.  I had an amazing amount of fun painting the tri-corn on the other Ranger officer, and it makes me look even more forward to the eminent releases from the galloping major.  We’ve already seen the Provincial officer, I’m hoping for other regular types in the very near future.