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Mohawks (5) – Warpaint Time

So, I’ve had these lads sitting around for some time.  I currently have 120ish models from the Galloping Major and that includes NO doubles of the same figure.  Pretty impressive.  When I began to order from the Major, I made a small purchase and decided I love them then made a larger purchase, which happened to be one of everything at the time.  So I had an extra pack of Mohawks around and I could never bring myself to paint them, and this has bothered me for a long time.

Many painters and gamers buy impulsively and have LARGE amounts of lead laying around ready to be painted.  I am not one of those guys, due to a young family I have a very SMALL stipend available for purchases each month, so small that I can easily keep up with painting them and have no left over pile that I won’t ever get to.  That being said I never found the time to paint my “doubles”.  I made a deal with myself, I would paint them but I would do it quickly and dirty, something I can’t normally bring myself to do!   Many period painting show large amounts of the natives in black warpaint covering their entire bodies.  I have two such painted guys in my collection already, since the Native flesh takes me the longest to accomplish, I thought this is where I could shave the most time off.

I think they look a little odd taken as a group by themselves, but once I mix them with the 30 others that I own, they should fit in nicely.

I also painted this guy a while back and I’ve been waiting to have some other FIW stuff painted so I could add him to a post.  This is the last of the Soldiers Fee from the Galloping Major.  You can never have enough club wielding Indians in the forest.

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Review of Bloody Mohawk

Bloody Mohawk  by Robert Berleth

This is simply a fantastic book, both in terms of writing and content.  I thoroughly enjoyed it from the moment I started reading until the moment I put it down.  It takes you through the Mohawk Valley from 1713-1794 and details the major ethinic groups and individuals that lived and competed in the area.

I was primarily interested in the French and Indian War for this area, but I was riveted with the American War of Independence sections as well.  The area was involved with the Saratoga Campaign which is one of the events that I have previously researched.

I had always wondered what “Palatine Germans” were when reading about events here and now I know.  The interplay between the different ethnic groups is clearly defined and explained in the book against the back drop of two wars and many events.   You leave the  book knowing why events happened here and with a detailed account of the major battles as well.  The writing is very well done and captures your interest from the outset.

By 1713 the Mohawk Valley was home to Palatine Germans, Dutch, English, Scots, Irish, New Englanders, Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, Seneca, and Tuscarora.  Each of these groups intermarried and related to the others through trade and travel.  It’s during this time that the Iroquois League denigrates and New York becomes more than a backwater.
Can’t recommend it enough, get this book if you are interested in the FIW!

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Mohawks (4) – Last of the Mohawk…ins

It’s with great pleasure that put the final bits of paint on these fine warriors.  I really enjoyed painting the Mohawks as they were the first FIW figs that I painted and are really a lot of fun.  I used a lot of blue and read and warpaint on this last batch.  Not much to say that hasn’t already been said about painting them here.  I can’t wait to get my hands on some rumored Indians with hand weapons coming from the Galloping Major in the distant future.

Anyway, here they are.

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Mohawks (3)

I have been painting Mohawk warriors for a while now and I thought it was finally time I plowed through some of my more favorite models. I wanted to wait a while before I tried them to make sure that I worked out the bugs and did the best job I could on them.

These guys were great fun to paint and I had a lot of fun with the more characterful models in this group. There are a four guys from the Galloping Major’s Mohawk Command pack in this lot and they ooze character. These two lads were my favorite to paint of all the 28’s I have done so far.

Here is the gallery.

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Mohawks (2)

This is the first time I have painted a second group of figures. Meaning, I have already painted a group of Mohawks, but I painted three other groups of figures before starting this group.

Having a go at them was easier this time as I have much more experience under my belt than I did. Color choices came easier as I think I have maxed out the number of different colors I can use for leggings and the little things. This limited number of different colors should bring some cohesion to the group even thought they are dressed uniquely. The Mohawk remain my favorite to paint as there is sooo much personality in these lads.

I have finally gained some confidence with painting war paint. I have really gone for it with these guys, giving everyone some sort of paint on the face. Mixed with the 6 that I painted before, that’s 50% of the Mohawks sporting war paint. I am compiling a list of sites and posts that I use for inspiration as I find it hard to create unique and random warpaint schemes. But it’s coming along.

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Mohawks 1

I’ve been showing my progress on these guys for a few posts now.

Well, they’re finally finished and I’m damned happy with the results.

One of the toughest parts for me is picking out the right colors to use, not necessarily paint shades but general colors. I’m getting more comfortable picking them out, but a uniform is very easy to decided upon. It’s really the freedom to choose that I’m coming to grips with. In 6mm with militia and other non-uniform troops, I pick out a pattern when painting and then randomize them on the stands. I’m sure it’ll get easier.

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Can I Call It a War Party?

Alright, I have three of the buggers finished. I even felt like getting a little crazy on one loin cloth. I’ve been debating as to what kind of base to mount them on. I’ve put a few questions out on blogs asking about bases that I like. One of the typical answers seems to be English pennies. Well, I used to live in the UK and instead of asking my wife’s family for a constant supply of pennies, I thought about using a US penny. Then I thought I wouldn’t mind the extra gram or two and a bit more breathing room, so I went and mounted them on dimes, almost insuring I’ll never meet anyone that bases them the same way. But dimes are 21.2mm in diameter and 2mm thick, so I like them. If I had an easy source, I’d prefer something magnetic, but I don’t have the patience to source it and shop for them at the moment.

I’m feeling a little more relaxed when painting individual troops. It seems like for the past five years, I’ve been painting to fill a quote so I could play the massive games that I have going around in my head. Each unit was fun to finish and put in the line, but near the end there was little reward in the process. With painting for a skirmish game, you can give the models some personality. This seems like a more fun experience at the moment. On the same token, I can’t imagine a unit of 16 of these guys representing 500 men either. 1 to 1 seems to be the order of the day. I’ve already got a great name for my lead Ranger when they arrive.

I’ve got a boat load more of the Galloping Major’s figures arriving soon, though they seem to be delayed by “inclement” weather in Britain.

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The Mohawks Have Landed

Alright, I started reading about the French and Indian War recently. As a change from 6mm, I choose FIW skirmish as a little break, and I like what I see so far. I had asked around and was recomended Conquest Miniatures for my Native Americans, but was unhappy with the level of info they had for painting them. I had all the relavant Osprey titles and some Troiani plates from the AWI, but I wanted more info. In the search, I came across the Galloping Major Wargames figures. It was pretty much love at first sight. I really liked the look of the Indians and was sold. I put in the list of figures for Chrismas to the wife, but couldn’t wait and ordered a small sample to tide me over while they arrived.

When they showed up, I wasn’t disappointed. I quickly picked out my least favorite of the poses to practice on (a hard choice as they all were good) and got to work. Some posts on message boards and some contact with the owner/sculptor of Galloping Major and I had a good idea of where to start. There is some amazing examples of painted figures on his site and I was particularly taken with the following one.

So I set out to recreate it. Let me know what you think.