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Mohawks (5) – Warpaint Time

So, I’ve had these lads sitting around for some time.  I currently have 120ish models from the Galloping Major and that includes NO doubles of the same figure.  Pretty impressive.  When I began to order from the Major, I made a small purchase and decided I love them then made a larger purchase, which happened to be one of everything at the time.  So I had an extra pack of Mohawks around and I could never bring myself to paint them, and this has bothered me for a long time.

Many painters and gamers buy impulsively and have LARGE amounts of lead laying around ready to be painted.  I am not one of those guys, due to a young family I have a very SMALL stipend available for purchases each month, so small that I can easily keep up with painting them and have no left over pile that I won’t ever get to.  That being said I never found the time to paint my “doubles”.  I made a deal with myself, I would paint them but I would do it quickly and dirty, something I can’t normally bring myself to do!   Many period painting show large amounts of the natives in black warpaint covering their entire bodies.  I have two such painted guys in my collection already, since the Native flesh takes me the longest to accomplish, I thought this is where I could shave the most time off.

I think they look a little odd taken as a group by themselves, but once I mix them with the 30 others that I own, they should fit in nicely.

I also painted this guy a while back and I’ve been waiting to have some other FIW stuff painted so I could add him to a post.  This is the last of the Soldiers Fee from the Galloping Major.  You can never have enough club wielding Indians in the forest.

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Mohawks (4) – Last of the Mohawk…ins

It’s with great pleasure that put the final bits of paint on these fine warriors.  I really enjoyed painting the Mohawks as they were the first FIW figs that I painted and are really a lot of fun.  I used a lot of blue and read and warpaint on this last batch.  Not much to say that hasn’t already been said about painting them here.  I can’t wait to get my hands on some rumored Indians with hand weapons coming from the Galloping Major in the distant future.

Anyway, here they are.

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Mohawks (3)

I have been painting Mohawk warriors for a while now and I thought it was finally time I plowed through some of my more favorite models. I wanted to wait a while before I tried them to make sure that I worked out the bugs and did the best job I could on them.

These guys were great fun to paint and I had a lot of fun with the more characterful models in this group. There are a four guys from the Galloping Major’s Mohawk Command pack in this lot and they ooze character. These two lads were my favorite to paint of all the 28’s I have done so far.

Here is the gallery.

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Huron (2)

I started this project as a fan of the Rangers and Iroquois, and really only choose to paint their opponents out of necessity. I suppose that comes from living on this side of the border (even if only by 1.5 miles). I’ve really come to like the Huron models as I paint more of them.

You still can’t beat a Mohawk scalplock, but the wider variety of warpaint colors available to the Huron gives these guys a leg up when painting. Until now I’ve been really conservative with the warpaint, but I really went for it with this group splashing the red and black around as much as I dared. I’m still not ready to use purple, but I tried one with green to see how it went, it doesn’t look to outlandish.

These guys turned out well I think. I wanted to do justice to the dramatic pose of the gent holding a rifle over his head with a wide stance. I’m not sure I did as he looks a little plain upon reflection. One more batch and the Huron should be finished.

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Warpaint Your Own Indian!

by rgregory

For a while now, I’ve been suffering over how to make unique warpaint schemes on my Northeastern Woodland Indians. I came up with the idea of starting a collection of warpaint designs.

Scott from Paperterrain.com was kind enough to create a blank template for us to draw on. So if you feel like contributing to the collection, go to the Warpaint Schemes page to have a look, then the Submit Your Warpaint Scheme page to download, paint, and upload your design for inclusion in the collection.

Perhaps there will be some readers with some artistic talent that we could all benefit from?

[button link=”http://syw6mm.com/warpaint-schemes/” color=”red”]Get Started![/button]

If there is enough interest I’ve got a Huron template to try out.

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Mohawks (2)

This is the first time I have painted a second group of figures. Meaning, I have already painted a group of Mohawks, but I painted three other groups of figures before starting this group.

Having a go at them was easier this time as I have much more experience under my belt than I did. Color choices came easier as I think I have maxed out the number of different colors I can use for leggings and the little things. This limited number of different colors should bring some cohesion to the group even thought they are dressed uniquely. The Mohawk remain my favorite to paint as there is sooo much personality in these lads.

I have finally gained some confidence with painting war paint. I have really gone for it with these guys, giving everyone some sort of paint on the face. Mixed with the 6 that I painted before, that’s 50% of the Mohawks sporting war paint. I am compiling a list of sites and posts that I use for inspiration as I find it hard to create unique and random warpaint schemes. But it’s coming along.

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Huron (1)

Just finished these up last night. This is the second set of Indians I’ve done and the first with any experience in 28mm behind me, if paint all of 19 models counts as experience. I used a wash on these, which I didn’t on my previous Mohawks, and I think it helps to soften the skin tones and helps define the muscles in a way my brushwork doesn’t.

I’m pretty happy with the way things turned out. This is my first trial at war paint, it’s a difficult thing for me to come to terms with. I’d be more comfortable if there were some sort of regulations that told me the three possible combinations or some such thing, but I think I’ll be out of luck on this one. My fear is that I’ll end up adding the same three “random” patterns to everyone, but we’ll see.

I painted these with darker colors than I used on the Mohawks as I’ve been thinking of realistic ways to distinguish the two tribes at tables length. I’d also like to run red on red battles with them, so some distinction is preferable. Don’t get me wrong, when looking at a model closely, there are many differences, but sometimes this is lost when viewing from far away. As I wrote that last sentence, I realize that the Mohawk have feathers in their hair and the Huron don’t…damn, just checked the website and it’s consistent. That’s a bunch of wasted brain power, but at least I’ve got the easy recognition that I was after.

Without further ado, here’s the new batch.

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Further Canoe Progress

I’ve had a bit more time to work on the canoe. This time instead of using sand paper, I went whole hog and broke out the dremmel tool. I threw out a lot of dust, but was able to work on it at a much faster pace.

I really like where it’s at right now, I have only some minor smoothing to do and it’s ready for some green stuff to be added for the details. This will finally make it look like a canoe I hope. A few seems in the right places.

I will say that the amount of dust I threw up while caving this scared me a little. I wore a mask for the most part, but still had while nostrils when finished. Who the hell knows what kind of stuff you are throwing around when sanding plumbers epoxy? This has lead me to look into creating a dust catcher. Once upon a time (after two years of schooling) I was a dental technician for about 60 days. But we did use a lot of equipment that is used in model making as we were custom sculpting and casting tiny teeth. One of the pieces of equipment that I will next try to create is a dust collector. Basically a vacuum with a head that sits right next to the dremmel and sucks in all the dust. I have an old vacuum cleaner in the basement that should do the trick.

Anyway, here’s where we are at.

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Make My Own Canoe!? Sure…

When I made the decision to leave 6mm behind and try something different, my main motivation was creating something with personality. Individuals and places rather than troops and battlefields. One of my main inspirations has come from a poster on the Lead Adventures forum, Silent Invader. I have seen what he has created and painted and I’d be happy to accomplish half as much as he has. One of his blog posts shows how he created his small water craft by hand. Now I don’t have any need for a canoe as I only have 6 figures painted, but I thought “HOW FREAKIN’ COOL, wonder if I could do that?” So, here is the beginning of my attempt.

I don’t want to post another person’s pictures on my blog, so I will refer to the photos from Silent Invaders blog that can be found here.

The first thing I did was take a trip to the hardware store to buy some plumber’s epoxy. I have never used the stuff before, but hey it’s about time right. Don’t let my wife know, she might expect me to fix a sink or something eventually. It was about $7, so not to bad, but not exactly cheap. Then again, not as expensive as buying one.


Next was to make the basic shape out of some sort of card type material. One of my students (I’m a teacher) left some scraps of poster board in my room yesterday, so I had my material. I copied the picture of the cut-outs from Silent Invaders blog onto a word document and blew it up to as large as possible on one piece of paper. Then printed it out, cut out the shapes, drew them onto the poster board, and cut those out. The two sides of the canoe in SI’s picture are different sizes due to camera angle when the shot was taken. I used the smaller size for my model. I used scotch tape to keep the pieces together temporarily. Here is the result. I’ve also placed some bases in one picture to make sure it will hold my figures. I’m hoping for a four figure capacity, but more about that later.

It’s hard to get my head around the fact that a lot of this frame will be sanded away during the process. Once I had the initial shape ready, it was time to start applying the epoxy. I started in the bow and stern and let that dry for a few minutes. Then I the epoxy to the sides of one half, that way it allowed my splint in the middle to keep the canoe-y shape. After a few more minutes, I added the epoxy to the other half.

I was pretty happy with my creation at this point. Then I looked at the one I’m supposed to be emulating. I think I made a big mistake. My sides are far too wide an d a base no longer fits on the flat surface at the bottom of my boat. We’ll see how it turns out.

The boat will be given it’s final shape through a combination of sanding and adding greenstuff.

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Mohawks 1

I’ve been showing my progress on these guys for a few posts now.

Well, they’re finally finished and I’m damned happy with the results.

One of the toughest parts for me is picking out the right colors to use, not necessarily paint shades but general colors. I’m getting more comfortable picking them out, but a uniform is very easy to decided upon. It’s really the freedom to choose that I’m coming to grips with. In 6mm with militia and other non-uniform troops, I pick out a pattern when painting and then randomize them on the stands. I’m sure it’ll get easier.